Assessment 2: Ethical Decision Making Paper Due Date: 27th October 2014 Weighting: 50% Length: 2,500 1 answer below »

Assessment 2: Ethical Decision Making Paper Due Date: 27th October 2014 Weighting: 50% Length: 2,500 words Need 10 Reference style: APA Topic: Vicious Cycle Setting: A community counselling service run buy a local church. Client: Spiro: 24 yo male, lives alone in the community; diagnosed with schizophrenia in his late teens; a member of the Freedom Christian City Church Fellowship. Stakeholders: Thea: Social work graduate, recently employed by the Freedom Christian City Fellowship to act as a coordinator, trainer and professional influence in the church’s volunteer-based counselling service. Pastor Koffken: Pastor of the Freedom Christian City Fellowship for more than 10 years; “grew” the church from a tiny assembly of 10 people to a thriving social and spiritual hub. Arthur P Wilkes: Church elder and lay counsellor. Jonathon: Specialised mental health nurse an Adult Mental Health outreach service; Spiro’s caseworker. Mick: Disability Support Worker, working with Spiro to enhance his independent living skills, employment options, social support, etc. “I don’t care whether it’s your fault; you’re there now, you know about it, and you need to stop it from happening”. Click. Beep, beep, beep, beep….. Thea stared at the phone and groaned. She had just spent more than 45 minutes in a long and heated discussion with Jonathon, who seemed like a good guy but… well, he could get very passionate about his work. Things were not going according to plan. For years, Thea had worked for a few hours each week as a volunteer in her church’s counselling service while she completed her degree. She had felt that the church, and the counselling service, could make a real difference in the local community- a place which was, in her experience, both materially and spiritually impoverished (though she knew “significantly behind the norm in all significant socio-economic indicators” was a more acceptable way of phrasing it). She should know- she grew up there. For this reason she had identified funding sources, prepared submissions, and sought the support of the church board so that the service could be properly funded with a professional coordinator and housed in a shopfront in a local mall. It was with a mix of pride and trepidation that she then accepted the position she now held… it seemed like the culmination of a long term dream that her professional, personal and spiritual values could come together to really make a difference. Which made Jonathon’s call all the more difficult. Jonathon identified himself as Spiro’s caseworker. Thea knew Spiro as a troubled and brooding young man who attended her youth group. He would attend diligently for months, and participate enthusiastically in church activities and services- then disappear from the face of the earth, only to resurface a month or so later. As far as Thea could recall, this pattern was established over a couple of years. Now she knew why. Jonathon had informed her that Spiro had schizophrenia, and, during his worst times, Spiro was unable to function in the mainstream community. He was prone to intrusive delusions and crippling paranoia, and, when he was unwell, he would usually sit alone in his tiny unit staring at the walls until a neighbour or family member arranged for him to be admitted to hospital. Over the last few years, his “episodes”, hospitalisation and treatment had fallen into a predictable cycle. In hospital, Spiro was responsive and insightful. The hospital staff would assist him in understanding his illness and maintaining compliance with treatment (both medication and regular psychotherapy). Balanced, settled, and strong, Spiro would be discharged from hospital. Within a few weeks Spiro would resume his friendships, supported employment, and social activities. The central pillar of his social world was the church community. Once he returned to church (looking well and coping well), he would start attending counselling with the church counselling service, seeing the same counsellor- Arthur Wilkes- each time. Thea remembered Arthur as a likeable, sociable gent in his 60s who was one of the members of the church board who supported her submission for funding for the counselling service and who personally encouraged her to apply for the coordinator’s position. According to Jonathon, Arthur would, with disturbing predicability, counsel and support Spiro to go off his medication. With faith, support, and the grace of God, Arthur maintained, Spiro could overcome his illness and find a way of living free from psychoactive drugs and psychiatrists. Spiro, feeling strong and confident, would invariably follow Arthur’s advice. After a few weeks of “success”, celebrated and encouraged by Arthur and other members of the church, Spiro would start to become unwell. Neither Arthur nor anyone else would see Spiro in the long, lonely days in his empty room, as his mental health deteriorated and his illness asserted itself. This was when Jonathon would be called to pick up the pieces, to assess Spiro, take him to hospital, and start the cycle again. Only this time, things hadn’t taken the same course. Spiro, after release from hospital (and in a seemingly lucid and rational state), had made a suicide attempt. He was in hospital again and Jonathon was refusing to support any discharge plans until Thea could guarantee that she would prevent any further contact between Arthur and Spiro. Furthermore, Jonathon was threatening to contact the counselling service’s funding bodies and report that the service was ineffective (at best) and downright dangerous (at worst). Thea had also spoken to Mick, a disability support worker who assisted Spiro with day-to-day living skills. Mick had found Spiro unconscious after a massive overdose and called an ambulance. Mick was tearful and distressed, blaming himself because Spiro appeared to be in great mental health the day before the suicide attempt. Mick had always praised the role that the church played in Spiro’s life, seeing it as an anchoring social system which provided personal care and a strong sense of belonging. Thea had also spoken with Pastor Koffken. The Pastor could acknowledge her concerns about Arthur’s counselling strategies, but reminded Thea that the approach was consistent with the teaching of the church- faith and hope were central beliefs and Spiro could overcome his illness with God’s help; she had been employed by the church because she shared their vision for the service; and Arthur was a church elder who had helped develop the counselling service and who was now the head of its management committee- he had a right to direct the style of service it offered. Thea looked down at her hands and groaned again (louder this time, and with a deeper sense of dread). She felt like she didn’t know what she believed anymore. Pastor Koffken and Arthur were arriving in 15 minutes for a discussion about the service. What would she tell them? Task Description: Students are to choose one person/character in the case study and write this assignment from the professional position of that person. Students are then to use ONE ethical decision-making model from the literature provided to identify how they would determine the competing ethical dimensions or principles inherent in the case, what professional positions and values are demonstrated by key stakeholders, what resources would be required to assist a decision-making process, what alternative courses of action are available, and what decision should ultimately be made about what to do. Justification should be provided for the final decision. The assignment should conclude with a personal reflection on the dynamics of interdisciplinary professional ethics. NB: This assignment should be written in first person.7033HSV Interdisciplinary Ethics Assignment Two: Assessment Criteria Sheet (ETHICAL DECISION MAKING PAPER 50%) STUDENT NAME: __________________________________________________________ Word count: (2,500 WORDS) Criteria Comments Mark Clear identification of the ethical dimensions of the presenting case, including competing principles and exploration of value positions of professionals involved. /15 Ability to use an ethical decision-making model to systematically explore the presenting situation, highlighting relevant steps of the process and identifying alternate courses of action. /20 Ability to reach a justified position that is consistent with professional practice, and evidence of personal reflection on interdisciplinary professional ethics and decision-making. /10 Ability to write a well-structured, grammatically correct and accurately referenced piece of academic work. /5 SIGNATURE OF MARKER: TOTAL: /50 ASSIGNMENT 2 TIP SHEET · The best way to start this assignment is to read through all the cases and chose one that you are interested in and perhaps have some knowledge of (although this is not essential). · In reading through the scenario, it should become clear that someone has an ethical dilemma that they are confronting. Work out who this person is, and write your assignment from the perspective of this person, putting yourself in their position so that you can develop an ethical decision making process from that perspective. If more than one person has an ethical dilemma, make note of that but choose one person. · Your writing will then go along the lines of: “If I were Matt (from scenario 1), I would first need to think carefully about what my ethical dilemma actually is, following the first step of the XXXX decision making process… In thinking this through I would need to work out the competing ethical principles, which in this case would appear to be XXXX vs XXXX”. · You can only work with what you have in the case (read it carefully as there are a lot of clues about people in the story), so don’t worry that you don’t have all the information – your job is to identify what information would potentially be needed and identify how you might go about getting the information. · When you come to the final part of your paper where you need to comment on interdisciplinary professional ethics, you can revert to yourself. You can use a heading for the final section if you like titled ‘Reflection on Interdisciplinary professional ethics’. · In some of the cases you might need to get specific about what information you need to access, so you could do this by thinking about what legislation or policies might impact on the area. · This is a very subjective assignment, so students always come up with different ways of approaching it – this is fine. The most important thing is that the assignment is about application of an ethical decision making process, so you need to make sure that this is what you do. If you don’t mention one of the models, then you won’t pass this paper. · You still need to draw in relevant references for this assignment. Up to 10 will be sufficient. Please check accuracy of referencing – APA style. · You need a clear structure – introduction and conclusion please. · 1.5 line spacing; Times New Roman 12pt; numbers on pages; names on front cover please. Make sure you keep a copy. · We hope you learn from these cases – all are true to life with identifying features changed – thanks go to Matthew Armstrong who is my ethics colleague from Kingaroy and who wrote these cases. · Any further questions, please email me. · Any requests for extensions on medical grounds need to be in writing before the date of submission.

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