QUESTIONSeen from the northern latitudes (mid-northernhemisphere), the star PolarisA.B.C.D.E.is neve

QUESTIONSeen from the northern latitudes (mid-northernhemisphere), the star PolarisA.B.C.D.E.is never above the horizon during the day.always sets directly in the west.is always above the northern horizon.is never visible during the winter.is the brightest star in the sky.QUESTIONAn observer on Earth’s equator would findA. the celestial equator passing at 45 degreesabove the northern horizon.B. The celestial equator passing at 45 degreesabove the southern horizon.C. that the celestial equator coincides with thehorizon.D. the celestial equator passing directlyoverhead.E. None of the above are true.QUESTIONAn observer at Earth’s geographic North Polewould find _______A. the celestial equator passing at 45 degreesabove the northern horizon.B. The celestial equator passing at 45degrees above the southern horizon.C. that the celestial equator coincides with thehorizon.D. the celestial equator passing directlyoverhead.E. None of the above are true.QUESTIONAn observer on Earth’s geographic North Polewould findA. Polaris directly overhead.B. Polaris 40° above the northern horizon.C. that the celestial equator coincides withthe horizon.D. that the celestial equator passing directlyoverhead.QUESTIONAn observer on Earth’s equator would findA.B.C.D.Polaris directly overhead.Polaris 40° above the northern horizon.Polaris on the Northern horizon.that the celestial equator passing directlyoverhead.QUESTIONThe ____ is the point on the celestial spheredirectly above an observer who can be at anypoint on the Earth.A.B.C.D.E.north celestial polesouth celestial polezenithcelestial equatornadirQUESTIONConstellation names are from _____ translatedinto _______, the language of science inEurope until the 19th century.A.B.C.D.E.Greek; LatinLatin; GreekLatin; ArabicGreek; EnglishGreek; ItalianQUESTIONMost star names, such as Aldebaran andBetelgeuse, are___ in origin.A.B.C.D.E.LatinGreekArabicEnglishItalianQUESTIONThe magnitude scaleA. originated just after the telescope wasinvented.B. can be used to indicate the apparentintensity of a celestial object.C. was devised by Galileo.D. is no longer used today.E. was used to determine the rate ofprecession.QUESTIONThe apparent visual magnitude of a star is ameasure of the star’sA.B.C.D.E.size.intensity.distance.color.temperature.QUESTIONThe apparent visual magnitude of a star is 7.3.This tells us that the star isA. one of the brighter stars in the sky.B. bright enough that it would be visibleeven during the day.C. not visible with the unaided eye.D. very far from Earth.E. very close to Earth.QUESTIONThe ____ of an object can be measured indegrees.A.B.C.D.E.apparent brightnessapparent magnitudezenithangular diametercolorQUESTIONAn observer’s nadir isA. the point directly opposite the observer’szenith.B. the north point on the observer’s horizon.C. located at the center of Earth.D. always located near a circumpolarconstellation.E. directly opposite the north celestial pole.QUESTIONA(n) ____ is 1/60th of a degree.A.B.C.D.E.precessionsecond of arcminute of arcnadirangular diameterQUESTIONA(n) ____ is 1/60th of a minute of arc.A.B.C.D.E.precessionsecond of arcdegreenadirangular diameterQUESTIONIn contrast to Ursa Major, the Big Dipper is nota(n) ___ but is instead a(n) ______A.B.C.D.E.star; constellationasterism; constellationa constellation; asterismWrong! Both are asterismsWrong! Both are official constellationsQUESTIONPrecession of the rotation axis of Earth iscaused byA. the force of gravity from the sun and moonon Earth’s equatorial bulge.B. the force of gravity from the sun and Jupiteron the Earth-moon system.C. the magnetic field of Earth.D. the formation and subsequent melting ofglaciers during the ice-ages.E. the impact of asteroids.QUESTIONAn observer in the Northern Hemispherewatches the sky for several hours. Due to themotion of Earth, this observer notices that thestars near the north celestial pole appear tomoveA. counter clockwise around the celestial pole.B. clockwise around the celestial pole.C. from left to right.D. from right to left.E. nearly vertically upward.QUESTIONYou live at a latitude of 73° N. What is theangle between the northern horizon and thenorth celestial pole?A.B.C.D.E.73°27°17°23 ½°5°QUESTIONYou live at a latitude of 39° S. What is theangle between the southern horizon and thesouth celestial pole?A. 45°B. 23.5°C. 39°D. 51°E. The answer depends on the day of the year.QUESTIONIf the north celestial pole appears on yourhorizon, what is your latitude?A.B.C.D.E.90° N90° S0°45° NThe latitude of the observer can not bedetermined from the information given.QUESTIONWhat is the approximate latitude of theobserver in the diagram below?A.B.C.D.E.90° N90° S50° N50° S0°QUESTIONWhat is the approximate latitude of theobserver in the diagram below?A.B.C.D.E.20° N20° S70° N70° S0°QUESTIONAn observer in theNorthern Hemispheretakes a time exposurephotograph of thenight sky. If theillustration depicts thephotograph taken bythe observer, whichdirection was thecamera pointing?A.B.C.D.straight northstraight eaststraight southstraight westQUESTIONAn observer in theNorthern Hemispheretakes a time exposurephotograph of thenight sky. If theillustration depicts thephotograph taken bythe observer, whichdirection was thecamera pointing?A.B.C.D.straight northstraight eaststraight southstraight westQUESTIONAn observer in theSouthernHemisphere takes atime exposurephotograph of thenight sky. If theillustration depicts thephotograph taken bythe observer, whichdirection was thecamera pointing?A.B.C.D.straight northstraight eaststraight southstraight westQUESTIONAn observer in theSouthern Hemispheretakes a timeexposure photographof the night sky. If theillustration depicts thephotograph taken bythe observer, whichdirection was thecamera pointing?A.B.C.D.straight northstraight eaststraight southstraight westQUESTIONAn observer in theSouthern Hemispheretakes a time exposurephotograph of the nightsky. If the illustrationdepicts the photographtaken by the observer,which direction was thecamera pointing?A.B.C.D.straight northstraight eaststraight southstraight westQUESTIONWhich star in the table would appear thebrightest to an observer on Earth?Α.Β.C.∆.Ε.α Cetα CMaNimρ Perδ DraQUESTIONBased on the information in the table, what isthe ratio of the intensity of Dra to that of Nim?A.B.C.D.E.2.51258.0711.14100QUESTIONWhich star in the table would not be visible tothe unaided eye of an observer on Earth?Α.Β.C.∆.Ε.α Cetα CMaNimρ Perδ DraQUESTIONStar A has an apparent visual magnitude of13.4 and star B has an apparent visualmagnitude of 15.4. Star A is ____ than star B.A.B.C.D.E.2 times fainter2 times brighter6.3 times fainter6.3 times brighter29.8 times fainterQUESTIONPolaris is a second magnitude star, and PhiPegasi is about 16 times fainter than Polaris.What is the approximate magnitude of PhiPegasi?A. 18B. −14C. 3∆. − 3E. 5QUESTIONDo the constellations visible in the sky at a particulartime of night (say 9 p.m.) follow a seasonal pattern?A. No, the same constellations are visible at 9 p.m. onany clear night of the year.B. No. As the year progresses, the constellationsvisible at 9 p.m. are the same but their shapeschange.C. Yes, at 9 p.m. during a clear winter night ALL of theconstellations you can see are different from theones that appear at 9 pm during a summer night.D. Yes, at 9 p.m. during a summer night most of theconstellations you can see are different from thoseyou can see on a winter night. However, there areQUESTIONWhich of the following statements correctlydescribes the relationship between stars andconstellations?A. Only stars close to the ecliptic (the Earth’sorbital plane) are located in constellations.B. Every star is located in a constellation.C. Only the brighter stars are in constellations.D. Only those stars that were visible to theancient Greeks are located in constellations.QUESTIONHow much of the night sky is north of thecelestial equator?A. Less than one-half, because of the tilt ofthe equator to the ecliptic plane.B. More than one-half, because of theprecession of the poles.C. Exactly one-half.D. All of the night sky.QUESTIONIf you point toward the zenith right now and thenpoint there again 6 hours later, you will havepointed twice in the same direction relative toA.B.C.D.your horizon.the Sun.the Moon.the fixed stars.QUESTIONIf an observer walks north toward increasinglatitude, the number of circumpolar stars wouldA.B.C.D.remain constant.decrease.increase.Unknown unless you also state thelongitude of the observer.QUESTIONIf you were standing on the Earth’s equator,which of the following in the sky would passthrough your zenith during the entire day (24hours)?A. The north celestial poleB. The south celestial poleC. The celestial equatorD. The nadirQUESTIONIf you are standing at the Earth’s North Pole,which of the following would be located at thezenith?A.B.C.D.The nadirThe star VegaThe celestial equatorThe north celestial poleQUESTIONStars in the same constellationA. probably formed at the same time.B. must be part of the same cluster of stars inspace.C. must have been discovered at about thesame time at the same location in space.D. may actually be very different distancesaway from the observer and from eachother.QUESTIONDuring the month of June the north celestialpole points towards Polaris but during themonth of December it pointsA.B.C.D.E.just north of Polaris.just south of Polaris.towards the star Vega.towards the star Thuban.still towards Polaris.QUESTIONThe constellations were created by the Greeks.1. True2. FalseQUESTIONA second magnitude star in Ursa Major isbrighter than a fourth magnitude star in Orion.1. True2. FalseQUESTIONThe Greek letter designation conveysinformation about a star’s location andbrightness.1. True2. FalseQUESTIONThe celestial equator always passes directlyoverhead.1. True2. FalseQUESTIONNavigators can find their latitude in thenorthern hemisphere by measuring the anglefrom the northern horizon to the north celestialpole.1. True2. FalseQUESTIONA scientific model is a mental conception thatprovides a framework that helps us think aboutsome aspect of nature.1. True2. False

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